The Inngot IP Manifesto #ipmanifesto

Author

UK Business Angels Association

14 April 2015

Q: What does it really take to build a successful knowledge economy?

A: Start valuing knowledge!

We can’t create an innovation-fueled economy if companies aren’t able to harness the ‘fruits’ of their investment in knowledge. These fruits are generally intangible – and too hard to finance.

Over the past year or so, since  Banking on IP? was published, the quality of the debate on the role intellectual property could and should be playing in business funding has greatly improved. But while there is a lot more talk (which is good), there’s still not enough action (which is not good).

It’s time for a change. At Inngot, we’re doing our bit by creating and delivering the tools businesses need to understand what IP they own and what it may be worth – but we need more innovators like Lombard to ‘see the light’ about the value and utility of intangibles in funding. The run-up to the General Election seems like as good a time as any to spell out the help we’d like in policy terms – not just on funding but on IP protection and data access.

The seven policies below are explained further on the Inngot website. There are links for you to decide on your favourites, and to propose policies that you feel have been left out, but which would also support the use of IP in innovation and growth.

1. Leverage IP investment: recognise value in intangible assets

2. Enable core IP to be used as collateral for lending

3. Help new ideas take off: raise EIS tax relief to 40%

4. Get IP into the secondary curriculum

5. Encourage derivative works, not rip-offs

6. Keep properly targeted tax breaks for IP

7. Insist on better IP record-keeping

Tell us what you think – and help feed the IP policy debate!

Q: What does it really take to build a successful knowledge economy?

A: Start valuing knowledge!

We can’t create an innovation-fuelled economy if companies aren’t able to harness the ‘fruits’ of their investment in knowledge. These fruits are generally intangible – and too hard to finance.

Over the past year or so, since Banking on IP? was published, the quality of the debate on the role intellectual property could and should be playing in business funding has greatly improved. But while there is a lot more talk (which is good), there’s still not enough action (which is not good).

It’s time for a change. At Inngot, we’re doing our bit by creating and delivering the tools businesses need to understand what IP they own and what it may be worth – but we need more innovators like Lombard to ‘see the light’ about the value and utility of intangibles in funding. The run-up to the General Election seems like as good a time as any to spell out the help we’d like in policy terms – not just on funding but on IP protection and data access.

The seven policies below are explained further on the Inngot website. There are links for you to decide on your favourites, and to propose policies that you feel have been left out, but which would also support the use of IP in innovation and growth.

1. Leverage IP investment: recognise value in intangible assets

2. Enable core IP to be used as collateral for lending

3. Help new ideas take off: raise EIS tax relief to 40%

4. Get IP into the secondary curriculum

5. Encourage derivative works, not rip-offs

6. Keep properly targeted tax breaks for IP

7. Insist on better IP record-keeping

Tell us what you think – and help feed the IP policy debate!

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